September 1st  -  177 notes  -  J

jennacoleman:

Clara Oswald in Robot of Sherwood.

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© jennacoleman)
# dw
September 1st  -  1,572 notes  -  J

amywiliams:

doctor who - robot of sherwood

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© amywiliams)
# dw
September 1st  -  849 notes  -  J

The women have as much right to fight for their lives as the men do.

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© bisexualmerlin)
September 1st  -  40,324 notes  -  J

Harry Potter And The Chamber of Secrets

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© mexicansamuel)
# hp
September 1st  -  187,356 notes  -  O

Good wifi on the Hogwarts Express this year

victorydancebitches:

can-i-please-kiss-you-if-i:

neverknowinglybeserious:

a-hobbit-john:

hiiddles:

wife-of-loki:

MINE IS CRAPPY
WHAT CARRIAGE ARE YOU IN!??!?!

COME TO THE BACK 

THE SLYTHERINS HAVE HACKED DUMBLEDORE’S WIFI

1GB BITCHES

Thanks to the Ravenclaws, guys.

The password’s “AL0H4M0R4”
Pass it on. 

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© accioheadcanons)
September 1st  -  3,184 notes  -  J

bahtmun:

Welcome back home.

reblogged 2 hours ago  (© bahtmun)
# hp
September 1st  -  5,675 notes  -  J

batcii:

"alright alright I’ll take you down"
"IT’S TOO LATE. MY YOUNG LIFE IS SQUANDERED"

james learned two things that day; one, a romantic flight around the grounds isn’t actually a great idea for a first date, and two, lily evans was a drama queen of the likes of sirius

reblogged 3 hours ago  (© batcii)
# jily
September 1st  -  143,259 notes  -  J

Feminism isn’t about making women stronger. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength.

— G.D Anderson  (via blissful-unawareness)
reblogged 3 hours ago  (© saperathebook)
September 1st  -  37 notes  -  O

an-augustus-waters-fetish:

remember that time last year when commentarius and tlat updated within the same month good times

September 1st  -  5,694 notes  -  J

harrypotterdailly:

Here’s your ticket. Stick to it, Harry, it is very important. Stick to it.

reblogged 3 hours ago  (© harrypotterdailly)
# hp
September 1st  -  381,316 notes  -  O

dontbeanassbutt:

moc-tod-ffuts-modnar:

iamtonysexual:

sherlock-mania:

remember-pants-terezi:

heyxkids:

YOU CANT CHANGE THE VOLUME OF THE VOICE IN YOUR HEAD

FUCKING TRY I DARE YOU

ITS IMPOSSIBLE AND ITS REALLY FUCKING WITH MY MIND SOMEONE HUG ME

I CAN MAKE IT SCREAM WITHOUT GETTING LOUDER

H E L P

Holy shit whispering is the same volume as shouting as loud as I can

what have you done

We think in concepts

Concepts have no volume

Because a thought is the loudest silence of all.

whoa there socrates

reblogged 4 hours ago  (© heyxbuds)
September 1st  -  717 notes  -  J

leebarguss:

On the Road | Part 3 (by Justyna Zduńczyk)

reblogged 4 hours ago  (© behance.net)
September 1st  -  271 notes  -  J

J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” novels have a great many concerns that express the series’ larger themes of fascism, democracy and diversity. Among them is the struggle for the rights of house-elves, who play an enormous role in the functioning of the wizarding world even as they reap almost none of the rewards of the magical economy.

The house-elves emerge as characters in the “Harry Potter” novels much in the same way that children themselves might become aware of the workings of the economy as a whole. When Rowling’s characters initially enroll in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, they think certain things there come to pass by magic. Food appears, beautifully prepared, on dinner tables. Beds are made, fires are lit.

But Harry and his friends Ron and Hermione come to learn that most of these tasks are performed by house-elves, who work not just at Hogwarts but in the homes of many wizarding families. In almost all cases, they are bound to their employers by magic, which is convenient for wizards in two ways: They can force these virtual slaves to do even the most dangerous and disagreeable tasks, and they can do it without paying the house-elves.

Ultimately Harry, Hermione and Ron decide that their concern for non-magical persons and certain classes of magical beings means that they must become advocates for house-elves’ rights as well.

But that is not the end of their education. They also learn that if you want to help people, you have to listen to what they want and need and respect their wishes. When the main characters in Rowling’s series inadvertently free a house-elf named Winky from her rigid wizard employer, they are initially surprised when she is devastated and becomes an alcoholic. The wizards saw her release as a simple matter of her rights, but Winky lost her home and what she perceived to be her family. Instead of just forcing her out of bad conditions, Harry, Hermione and Ron needed to convince Winky that a new kind of life would be better and then deliver on their promises.

And at the end of the “Harry Potter” novels, the three young characters get a powerful illustration of what solidarity really means.

"Why the Harry Potter books are the perfect way to explain Labor Day to kids" | by Alyssa Rosenberg for the Washington Post. (via thehpalliance)
reblogged 4 hours ago
# hp
September 1st  -  2,107 notes  -  J

"Whether you come back by page or by the big screen, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home."

Happy September 1st!

reblogged 4 hours ago  (© emmawayson)
# hp
September 1st  -  2,026 notes  -  J

Happy September 1st!

reblogged 4 hours ago  (© shirewalker)
# hp